Climate News

Angry Birds Movie 2 — Global-warming propaganda for tots


Can’t kids just be kids anymore? Of course not; they must be drafted into service as climate-change agents and social-justice warriors for the United Nations. That’s the message of The Angry Birds Movie 2, released in mid-August by Sony Pictures Entertainment. John Rego, vice president of sustainability, corporate responsibility and environmental affairs at Sony, took to the stage on August 27, the second day of the 68th United Nations Civil Society Conference in Salt Lake City, to introduce a UN-themed trailer for the movie and to extol the company’s partnership with the global body. The movie sequel, which hopes to build on the phenomenal success of the original Angry Birds movie (2016), is shameless political propaganda aimed at activating children and youth for “climate action.” It is also a sick form of child abuse, as surveys have shown an alarming number of children are terrified that the world is about to end, to the point that they are having nightmares and anxiety attacks. But this does not seem to bother the folks at the UN, who profess a deep and abiding concern for the well-being of children.

(Article by William F. Jasper republished from TheNewAmerican.com)

“The United Nations Department of Global Communications (DGC) is collaborating with Sony Pictures Entertainment and the UN Foundation in support of the UN ActNow climate campaign, a global call for citizen action on climate change,” a UN press release announced on July 10. “After the successful 2016 #AngryBirdsHappyPlanet campaign, the Angry Birds are joined this time around by their longtime enemies (turned ‘frenemies’) the pigs and are looking to spread awareness about individual actions we can all take to combat climate change,” the press statement continues.

“As part of the campaign, a public service announcement is launching today starring the Angry Birds, the green piggies and the English-speaking voice cast behind the film The Angry Birds Movie 2. Together, they are encouraging citizens to discover and track simple everyday actions that can make a difference by using the UN’s innovative new online climate action tool, the ActNow Bot.”

“Climate change is already impacting our world today regardless of where we live,” said Maher Nasser, Director, Outreach Division, UN Department of Global Communications. “It is through climate action — built on cooperation and collaboration within and across communities — that we can confront the climate crisis. We see many people around the world sounding the alarm and demanding action by world leaders. We are grateful to the Angry Birds for adding their voice again to the call for each of us to lead by example and demonstrate that every action counts.”

Read more at: TheNewAmerican.com



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